Social Change and Positive Psychology – Catching On To New Rhythms

Social change and positive psychology. Can Society Get More Satisfaction with Positive Psychology? My answer is a prompt ‘Yes’!
Positive Psychology has been criticized for putting the spotlight on the individual treadmill for a Life Worth Living (within a western perspective), for underestimating the importance of social context, or briefly: for existing only for white and rich people [1].

Although positive psychology is not about being happy-smiley all day long, or ignoring the ‘negative’ and the real problems of everyday people [2,3], positive psychology is now being asked to take its social vision to a whole new level, reaching larger groups of people [4], progressing towards higher forms of social accountability [5], committing to the collective responsibility to create conditions for fostering the strengths of others, and to harness those strengths for the benefit of the wider society [4]. In other words, is time to put positive psychology at the service of Social Change!

‘Imagine’ positive psychology sharing the world of Social Change – You may say I am a dreamer…

When talking about Social Change, usually topics like climate change or natural disasters, unemployment or poverty, gender violence or torture, war or terrorism come up, and are unsurprisingly backed by critical and negative analysis and messages [6].

So, what’s the role of positive psychology in this field?

Research, policy, and intervention within the Social Change field should look to what makes life bearable, as well as should include wellbeing, strengths, hope, motivation, successes and other aspects of positive functioning, being used to give a voice, to give power to the target communities [7].

Even in hardly demanding circumstances how can we go beyond the harms? What solutions have been tried and in what new solutions can we work on? When was the participation of community members to solve common issues more significant? How can we promote resilience in children born in poverty or open conflict? What solutions is the community suggesting to solve housing and situations where infrastructure is needed? How can community strengths be put in place in order to improve new programs of microcredit or women entrepreneurship in poor communities? How can we foster post-traumatic growth after war, torture or natural disasters? How can education include environmental sustainability? [5,8,9]…..

Positive psychology can directly respond to these questions (and many others), because positive psychology can help by imagining and envisioning a better life, even in harsh contexts [8,9]!
But am I saying or implying that the work that has been done in Social Change has been only focused on a fault mode? Not at all! Most of the projects contemplate community resources, resilience, social participation, etc. Nonetheless, I do believe that the value of positive psychology in this field is to complement, extend and deepen this resources/solution-focused orientation with its evidence-based knowledge and applied tools.

‘Come Together’… How does positive psychology effectively help to bring up a new beat to Social Change?

First, positive psychology can have a great impact in policy making, generating an important discussion around the idea of an economy driven to promote wellbeing [10], and help complementing the traditional economic indicators of quality of life [4].

Second, positive psychology has the responsibility to educate and share information about a thriving society [4]. Among other topics, it is fundamental that positive psychology points out the positive impact of prosocial spending on spenders (individuals or companies) [11], or to raise awareness about the importance of less money-oriented values for happiness [12, 13].

Finally, positive psychology can have a huge impact in community-based programs.
Organizations working in the field of Social Change are using appreciative inquiry to create new programming, refining existing projects and evaluating team performance [6]. Strengths programs [14] or microfinance programs using positive psychology tools [7] have been developed in poor communities to foster people’s potential, addressing the issue of empowerment [11].

But much else can be done! We can think of programs focused on resilience, post-traumatic growth, forgiveness and/or strengths, integrated in reconciliation and peacebuilding processes, or in recovery or psychotherapy plans in contexts of gender violence, torture or slavery. We are able to develop positive educational programs targeting environmental protection behaviors (contributing to environmental sustainability) or contemplating an open mindset when dealing with people from other cultures and races (reducing the broader base of sympathizers from which future recruits are drawn for terrorist groups). Or broad the scope of physical health programs, integrating Fredrickson’s idea of a ‘healthy emotional diet’, in order to boost up the results of objective physical indicators using low cost strategies.

The possibilities are endless!!! If positive psychology continues to move forward in its path of cross-cultural awareness and participatory processes of co-constructed knowledge [5], new questions, new bridges and new challenges will rise up!

[1] Coyne, J. (2013). Positive psychology is mainly for rich white people. Retrieved from http://blogs.plos.org/mindthebrain/2013/08/21/positive-psychology-is-mainly-for-rich-white-people/

[2] Peterson, C. (2008). What Is Positive Psychology, and What Is It Not? Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-good-life/200805/what-is-positive-psychology-and-what-is-it-not

[3] Rose, N. (2013). 7 common Misconceptions about Positive Psychology. Retrieved from http://mappalicious.com/2013/12/06/7-common-misconceptions-about-positive-psychology/

[4] Biswas-Diener, R., Linley, P. A., Govindji, R., & Woolston, L. (2011). Positive Psychology as a Force for Social Change. In K. M. Sheldon, T. B. Kashdan, & M. M. F. Steger (Eds.), Designing positive psychology: taking stock and moving forward (pp. 410-418). New York: Oxford.

[5] Marujo, H. A., & Neto, L. M. (2014). Toward a Participatory and Ethical Consciousness in Positive Psychology: The Value Positioning in the Genesis of This Book. In H. A. Marujo and L.M. Neto (Eds.), Positive Nations and Communities – Collective, Qualitative and Cultural-Sensitive Processes in Positive Psychology (pp. xv-xxiv). Dordrecht: Springer.

[6] Kutz, C. (2012). Using Positive Psychology to Organize for Social Change. Retrieved from http://www.trainingforchange.org/publications/using-positive-psychology-organize-social-change.

[7] Biswas-Diener, R. & Patterson, L. (2011). Positive Psychology and Poverty. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), PP as Social Change (pp. 125-140). New York: Springer.

[8] Thin, N. (2011). Socially Responsible Cheermongery: On the Sociocultural Contexts and Levels of Social Happiness Policies. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 33-49). New York: Springer.

[9] Scollon, C. N. & King, L. A. (2011). What People Really Want in Life and Why It Matters: Contributions from Research on Folk Theories of the Good Life. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 1-14). New York: Springer.

[10] Marks, N. (2011). Think Before You Think. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 17-32). New York: Springer.

[11] Aknin, L. B., Sandstrom, G. M., Dunn, E. W., & Norton, M. I. (2011). Investing in Others: Prosocial Spending for (Pro)Social Change. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 219-234). New York: Springer.

[12] Sachs, J. (2014). What is Sustainable Development? – The Age of Sustainable Development Coursebook.

[13] Kasser, T. (2011). Ecological Challenges, Materialistic Values, and Social Change. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 89-108). New York: Springer.

[14] Linley, P. A., Bhaduri, A., Sharma, D. S, & Govindji, R. (2011). Strengthening Underprivileged Communities: Strengths-Based Approaches as a Force for Positive Social Change in Community Development. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 141-156). New York: Springer.

About the Author: Ana is a clinical psychologist, a family therapist and a researcher. She is passionate about evidence-based applications of positive psychology to therapy, business, social change and sustainable development. Her flow experiences happen when she is with “her people”, having coffee, a good meal and/or a good wine, co-constructing conversations, ideas and meanings.

‘We Are The Positive Psychology People’

Pode a Sociedade Obter mais Satisfação com a psicologia positiva?

A minha resposta é um ‘Sim’ pronto e redondo! A  psicologia positiva tem sido criticada por dar demasiado ênfase no caminho individual daquilo que faz a “Vida que Valer a Pena ser Vivida” (no âmbito de uma perspetiva ocidental), por subestimar a importância dos contextos sociais ou, sucintamente, por se dirigir apenas para populações brancas e ricas [1].

Ainda que a psicologia positiva  não se reveja nesta perspetiva redutora da ‘pessoa feliz e sorridente’ todo o dia, ou de ignorar ‘o negativo’ e os problemas reais das pessoas comuns [2,3], é agora pedido à psicologia positiva que eleve a sua visão social, de chegar a grupos de pessoas mais amplos [4], progredindo em direção a formas mais elevadas de responsabilidade social [5], comprometida com a responsabilidade coletiva de criar condições para promover as forças de outros, e de potenciar o uso das mesmas em benefício da sociedade mais alargada [4]. Noutras palavras, é tempo de colocar apsicologia positiva ao serviço da Mudança Social!

Imagine a psicologia positiva a partilhar o mundo da Mudança Social – Pode dizer que eu sou uma sonhadora…

Quando se fala sobre Mudança Social, frequentemente temas como mudanças climatéricas ou desastres naturais, desemprego ou pobreza, violência de género ou tortura, guerra ou terrorismo emergem, e são associados, de forma não surpreendente, a análises e mensagens críticas e negativas [6].

Então, qual é o papel da psicologia positiva nesta esfera?

A investigação, as políticas e a intervenção no âmbito da Mudança Social devem olhar para o que torna a vida suportável, mas também para o bem-estar, as forças, a esperança, a motivação, os sucessos e outros aspetos do funcionamento positivo, dando poder, voz e participação às comunidades que são alvo de intervenções [7].

Mesmo em circunstâncias muito desafiantes, como podemos ir para além dos danos? Que soluções já foram experimentadas e em que novas soluções podemos nos debruçar? Quando foi a participação dos membros da comunidade mais significativa para resolver questões comuns? Como podemos promover a resiliência em crianças nascidas em situações de pobreza ou de conflito aberto? Que soluções sugere a comunidade para resolver as necessidades de habitação e de infraestrutura? Como é que as forças comunitárias podem ser utilizadas, com vista a melhorar programas de microcrédito ou de empreendedorismo no feminino em comunidades de pobreza? Como podemos promover o crescimento pós-traumático depois de situações de Guerra, tortura ou de desastres naturais? Como é que a educação pode incluir a sustentabilidade ambiental? [5,8,9]…..

A psicologia positiva pode ajudar a responder a estas questões (e a muitas outras!), atendendo a que pode auxiliar no processo de imaginar e visualizar uma vida melhor, mesmo em contextos muito severos [7,8]!
Mas devo enfatizar que não é minha intenção dar a entender que o trabalho em Mudança Social tem sido apenas focado nos problemas, falhas ou faltas. De modo algum! A maioria dos projetos contempla os recursos comunitários, a resiliência, a participação social, etc. Contudo, é minha opinião que o valor da psicologia positiva nesta área é complementar, alargar e aprofundar esta orientação focada nas soluções e nos recursos, com o conhecimento e as estratégias que tem vindo a desenvolver.

Unam-se… Como é que a psicologia positiva pode efetivamente ajudar a trazer uma nova batida à Mudança Social?

Primeiramente, a psicologia positiva pode ter um grande impacto na construção de políticas, fomentando a discussão em torno do que seria uma economia dirigida para a promoção do bem-estar [10], e ajudando a complementar os indicadores económicos tradicionais de qualidade de vida [4].

Um segundo aspeto prende-se com a responsabilidade da psicologia positiva na educação e partilha de informação de uma sociedade em florescimento. Entre outros tópicos, é fundamental que apsicologia positiva divulgue o impacto positivo dos gastos prosociais nos investidores (individuais ou organizações) [11], assim como que promova a consciencialização da importância de valores menos orientados pelo dinheiro para a felicidade [12,13].

Por último, a psicologia positiva pode ter um impacto muito relevante em programas comunitários.
Organizações a trabalhar na área da Mudança Social encontram-se a utilizar o inquérito apreciativo para criar novos programas, melhorar projetos e avaliar o desempenho das equipas [6]. Programas baseados nas forças [14] ou programas de microfinanças utilizando ferramentas da psicologia positiva [9] têm sido desenvolvidos em comunidades de pobreza para promover o potencial humano, dando especial atenção à questão do empoderamento das comunidades [11].

Mas muito mais pode ser feito! Podemos conceber programas focados na resiliência, no crescimento pós-traumático, no perdão e/ou nas forças, integrados em processos de reconciliação ou de construção da paz, de planos de recuperação ou psicoterapêuticos em contextos de violência de género, tortura ou escravidão. Estamos em condições de desenvolver programas educacionais positivos que foquem comportamentos de proteção ambiental (contribuindo para a sustentabilidade ambiental) ou que contemplem uma estrutura de pensamento aberta na relação com pessoas de outras raças e de outras culturas (reduzindo genericamente o número de simpatizantes que poderão no futuro ser atraídos para grupos de terroristas). Podemos ainda alargar o espectro dos programas de saúde física, integrando o conceito de ‘dieta emocional saudável’ de Fredrickson, com vista a melhorar os resultados em vários indicadores objetivos de saúde, através de estratégias de baixo custo.

De facto, há um conjunto infindável de novas possibilidades! Se a psicologia positiva continuar o trabalho que tem feito no sentido de se tornar mais consciente, sensível e adaptada às diferenças culturais, assim como no desenvolvimento de processos participativos de co-construção do conhecimento [5], novas questões, novas pontes, novos desafios irão emergir!

[1] Coyne, J. (2013). Positive psychology is mainly for rich white people. Retrieved from http://blogs.plos.org/mindthebrain/2013/08/21/positive-psychology-is-mainly-for-rich-white-people/

[2] Peterson, C. (2008). What Is Positive Psychology, and What Is It Not? Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-good-life/200805/what-is-positive-psychology-and-what-is-it-not.

[3] Rose, N. (2013). 7 common Misconceptions about Positive Psychology. Retrieved from http://mappalicious.com/2013/12/06/7-common-misconceptions-about-positive-psychology/

[4] Biswas-Diener, R., Linley, P. A., Govindji, R., & Woolston, L. (2011). Positive Psychology as a Force for Social Change. In K. M. Sheldon, T. B. Kashdan, & M. M. F. Steger (Eds.), Designing positive psychology: taking stock and moving forward (pp. 410-418). New York: Oxford.

[5] Marujo, H. A., & Neto, L. M. (2014). Toward a Participatory and Ethical Consciousness in Positive Psychology: The Value Positioning in the Genesis of This Book. In H. A. Marujo and L.M. Neto (Eds.), Positive Nations and Communities – Collective, Qualitative and Cultural-Sensitive Processes in Positive Psychology (pp. xv-xxiv). Dordrecht: Springer.

[6] Kutz, C. (2012). Using Positive Psychology to Organize for Social Change. Retrieved from http://www.trainingforchange.org/publications/using-positive-psychology-organize-social-change.

[7] Biswas-Diener, R. & Patterson, L. (2011). Positive Psychology and Poverty. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), PP as Social Change (pp. 125-140). New York: Springer.

[8] Thin, N. (2011). Socially Responsible Cheermongery: On the Sociocultural Contexts and Levels of Social Happiness Policies. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 33-49). New York: Springer.

[9] Scollon, C. N. & King, L. A. (2011). What People Really Want in Life and Why It Matters: Contributions from Research on Folk Theories of the Good Life. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 1-14). New York: Springer.

[10] Marks, N. (2011). Think Before You Think. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 17-32). New York: Springer.

[11] Aknin, L. B., Sandstrom, G. M., Dunn, E. W., & Norton, M. I. (2011). Investing in Others: Prosocial Spending for (Pro)Social Change. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 219-234). New York: Springer.

[12] Sachs, J. (2014). What is Sustainable Development? – The Age of Sustainable Development Coursebook.

[13] Kasser, T. (2011). Ecological Challenges, Materialistic Values, and Social Change. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 89-108). New York: Springer.

[14] Linley, P. A., Bhaduri, A., Sharma, D. S, & Govindji, R. (2011). Strengthening Underprivileged Communities: Strengths-Based Approaches as a Force for Positive Social Change in Community Development. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.), Positive Psychology as Social Change (pp. 141-156). New York: Springer.

A Autora: Ana é psicóloga clínica, terapeuta familiar e investigadora. É apaixonada pelas aplicações da Psicologia Positiva na terapia, nas organizações, na mudança social e no desenvolvimento sustentável. Os seus momentos de flow acontecem quando está com “as suas pessoas” bebendo um café, partilhando uma simpática refeição ou um bom vinho, coconstruindo conversas, ideias e significados.

‘We Are The Positive Psychology People’

Share This